As teachers and care providers, it is our job at Peace of Mind to support you as parents with the growth and development of your child. A commonly held concern is about potty training – whether your child is ready or not, and how can we help the process go as smoothly as possible, for you and your child!

 

Children are typically ready to potty train between 2 and 4 years old, and parents can read signs of readiness by noting the cues the child is showing. Cues can include having dry and clean diapers for extended periods of time, being bothered by having a soiled diaper, asking for underwear, being interested in siblings or parents using the toilet, and displaying a general curiosity of bathroom activities.  At Peace of Mind, generally we help with potty training starting in the older toddler room (after a child turns two), however, if children are showing interest and signs of readiness, we can start helping them explore the “potty” at an even earlier age.

 

Once parents have decided to start the potty training process, there are a few basics to keep in mind. Expect accidents, and be prepared – hauling around multiple changes of clothing isn’t fun, but it’s better than being caught without them. Have patience and be positive, even when an accident occurs. Children are sensitive to facial cues and voice tones, so any shaming or disappointment may actually delay the process. Offer to take your child to the potty as frequently as you feel it is relevant. Praise every effort, even if it’s as small as a child sitting fully clothed on a toilet. Encourage healthy and safe curiosity by allowing a child to flush the potty, even if s/he didn’t produce any waste (but please discourage him or her from trying to touch the water in the potty – safety first!). Toilets are big, loud, new, and different, so “never force a child onto a toilet. Ever. Even if you know the child in the corner is pooping, do not force them into the bathroom. Instead encourage them to walk to the bathroom, help them clean up and wash hands…(and) say something like ‘Ne

As teachers and care providers, it is our job at Peace of Mind to support you as parents with the growth and development of your child. A commonly held concern is about potty training – whether your child is ready or not, and how can we help the process go as smoothly as possible, for you and your child!

 

Children are typically ready to potty train between 2 and 4 years old, and parents can read signs of readiness by noting the cues the child is showing. Cues can include having dry and clean diapers for extended periods of time, being bothered by having a soiled diaper, asking for underwear, being interested in siblings or parents using the toilet, and displaying a general curiosity of bathroom activities.  At Peace of Mind, generally we help with potty training starting in the older toddler room (after a child turns two), however, if children are showing interest and signs of readiness, we can start helping them explore the “potty” at an even earlier age.

 

Once parents have decided to start the potty training process, there are a few basics to keep in mind. Expect accidents, and be prepared – hauling around multiple changes of clothing isn’t fun, but it’s better than being caught without them. Have patience and be positive, even when an accident occurs. Children are sensitive to facial cues and voice tones, so any shaming or disappointment may actually delay the process. Offer to take your child to the potty as frequently as you feel it is relevant. Praise every effort, even if it’s as small as a child sitting fully clothed on a toilet. Encourage healthy and safe curiosity by allowing a child to flush the potty, even if s/he didn’t produce any waste (but please discourage him or her from trying to touch the water in the potty – safety first!). Toilets are big, loud, new, and different, so “never force a child onto a toilet. Ever. Even if you know the child in the corner is pooping, do not force them into the bathroom. Instead encourage them to walk to the bathroom, help them clean up and wash hands…(and) say something like ‘Next time when you need to poop you can come in here. Even if you aren’t ready to sit on the potty you can stand in here to go poop. Then when you are ready you can try the toilet.’ No judgment, just encouragement and support to get to the next stage.” (No Time for Flash Cards)

 

Every child is different, but we discourage the use of Pull Ups and suggest using thick training underpants or continuing to use a diaper while training. “Kids can really feel when they’re wet in underwear and most kids enjoy underwear rather than pull-up diapers.” It’s also possible to wear “a diaper on top of underwear…the child can feel when he’s wet, but there’s less mess” (Diane Peters). At Peace of Mind we cannot use the practice of having a child be bottomless due to health and sanitary concerns, but it can be a successful technique you may want to try at home. Once your child is successfully using the toilet, be sure to praise him or her extensively. Sticker charts and small rewards allow the child to see his or her efforts in a concrete way, and give feelings of pride and accomplishment.

 

At Peace of Mind, we do our best to mimic and support your potty training efforts, keeping things as consistent as possible. Please communicate with your child’s teacher about what you’re doing at home, and how – does your child wear a diaper at nap time, but only at nap time? How are accidents handled at home – do you have your child help put her soiled clothes away and clean herself? Are you using a sticker chart we should be contributing to? Does your child have brand new big boy underpants on that he is so proud of, and wants to talk about? All of these seemingly little things are important, but most of all, take a deep breath, and try to enjoy this stage of your child’s development. “‘Parents need to relax,’ says Vivian Turner, executive director of the Garneau University Childcare Centre in Edmonton. ‘There are very few adults walking around in diapers.’”

agement and support to get to the next stage.” (No Time for Flash Cards)

 

Every child is different, but we discourage the use of Pull Ups and suggest using thick training underpants or continuing to use a diaper while training. “Kids can really feel when they’re wet in underwear and most kids enjoy underwear rather than pull-up diapers.” It’s also possible to wear “a diaper on top of underwear…the child can feel when he’s wet, but there’s less mess” (Diane Peters). At Peace of Mind we cannot use the practice of having a child be bottomless due to health and sanitary concerns, but it can be a successful technique you may want to try at home. Once your child is successfully using the toilet, be sure to praise him or her extensively. Sticker charts and small rewards allow the child to see his or her efforts in a concrete way, and give feelings of pride and accomplishment.

 

At Peace of Mind, we do our best to mimic and support your potty training efforts, keeping things as consistent as possible. Please communicate with your child’s teacher about what you’re doing at home, and how – does your child wear a diaper at nap time, but only at nap time? How are accidents handled at home – do you have your child help put her soiled clothes away and clean herself? Are you using a sticker chart we should be contributing to? Does your child have brand new big boy underpants on that he is so proud of, and wants to talk about? All of these seemingly little things are important, but most of all, take a deep breath, and try to enjoy this stage of your child’s development. “‘Parents need to relax,’ says Vivian Turner, executive director of the Garneau University Childcare Centre in Edmonton. ‘There are very few adults walking around in diapers.’”