Our behavior guidance policy is designed to:
 Ensure that each child is provided with a positive model of acceptable behavior.
 Be tailored to the developmental level of the children that the program is licensed to serve.
 Redirect children and groups away from problems toward constructive activity in order to reduce conflict.
 Teach children how to use acceptable alternatives to problem behavior in order to reduce conflict.
 Protect the safety of children and staff persons.
 Provide immediate and directly related consequences for a child’s unacceptable behavior.
Young children need to be taught appropriate behaviors. Appropriate alternatives to corporal punishment vary as children grow and develop.
As infants become more mobile, the staff will create a safe space and impose limitations by encouraging activities that distract them from harmful situations. Brief verbal expressions of disapproval help prepare infants and toddlers for later use of reasoning. For toddlers, disapproval will be followed with comments and expected behaviors.
Preschoolers have begun to develop and understanding of rules and can understand ‘break tie” to calm down (Out-of-group activity by sending the child to a calming activity such as puzzles, sensory table). However, children will never be isolated from the group. The teacher will follow up by asking the child about his/her feelings and suggest appropriate behavior.
School-age children begin to develop a sense of personal responsibility and self-control and will recognize the removal of privileges.
We promote positive behavior in the following ways:
1. The classrooms are designed to be developmentally appropriate.
2. There are sufficient toys and activities to stimulate children of all age groups we serve.
3. The staff model, encourage and praise positive behaviors by using clear and positive statements of behavior expectations.
4. The curriculum is designed to be stimulating and age appropriate for the children.
5. The staff appropriately supervises and interacts with the children.
PERSISTENT UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOR
Peace of Mind Early Education Center will use the following procedure for behavior that is persistent and unacceptable that requires an increased amount of staff guidance and time. This behavior policy applies to all children in our care.

If a child is not behaving appropriately, we will use the following positive guidance techniques:
1. Ignoring: Ignoring a child who is trying to gain attention by acting out may be an appropriate response, unless it is a behavior that is unsafe.
2. Redirection/Distraction: This technique offers an alternative to a child such as suggesting a new activity, or different toy, encouraging independent play, or interacting with the child in a different way.
3. Discussion: Discussion with the child how their behavior is inappropriate and engaging with the child other words or methods that would suggest a more appropriate response.
4. Reasonable Consequences: The staff may implement reasonable consequences such as taking away a toy if the child used the toy to hit another child.
5. Take a Break: The child is separated from the group to calm down and will have access to something else to do. While the child will remain supervised, his or her classmates will not immediately influence him or her. This is different from the concept of “time out,” which is often seen as more punitive as the child is isolated and does nothing. In “take a break” the child will have access to other activities while he or she settles down. Once the negative behavior is under control, the child can be returned to the group. We do not use “take a break” with children under two years of age.
When staff observes a persistent unacceptable behavior they will observe and record the behavior in writing. If these positive guidance techniques are not effective, we may involve parents/guardians with the following progressive guidance techniques:
1. We will inform parent/guardians in writing what behaviors have been observed and what the staff has done to try to modify the behavior.
2. If the inappropriate behavior continues, the Center Director and teacher will meet with parents/guardians to develop a written action plan to correct the behavior. We will seek their input and agree on steps to attempt to modify the behavior. We may suggest involving outside resources to assist with the situation.
3. If the inappropriate behavior persists, the child will need to take a day or two of behavior leave of absence on the next scheduled day/s of care. (Standard attendance rates apply during behavioral leaves).
4. After returning to group care, if the child continues to act inappropriately, we may dis-enroll the child. We reserve the right to use these progressive guidance techniques at our discretion. It is our goal to work together for a positive outcome of behavior change. Circumstances may arise when we may immediately dis-enroll a child if his or her behavior creates a health or safety risk to themselves, other children, or the staff.
PROHIBITED ACTIONS
Positive reinforcement is the best approach to discipline. The following actions are prohibited by or at the direction of a staff person:
1. Subjection of a child to corporal punishment, which includes but is not limited to: Rough handling, shoving, hair pulling, ear pulling, shaking, slapping, kicking, biting, pinching, hitting, and spanking.
2. Subjection of a child to emotional stress, which includes but is not limited to: Name calling, ostracism, shaming, making derogatory remarks about a child or the child’s family, and using language that threatens, humiliates or frightens a child.
3. Separation of a child from the group except within rule requirements.
Punishments for lapses in toileting.
Withholding food, light, warmth, clothing, or medical care as a punishment for unacceptable behavior.
The use of physical restraint other than to physically hold a child where containment is necessary to protect a child or others from harm.
The use of mechanical restraints, such as tying.
SEPARATION FROM THE GROUP
No child may be separated from the group unless the following has occurred;
1. Less intrusive methods of guiding the child’s behavior have been tried and were ineffective.
2. The child’s behavior threatens the well-being of the child or other children in the program.
A child who requires separation from the group will:
1. Remain within an unenclosed part of the classroom where the child can be continuously seen and heard by a program staff person;
2. The child’s return to the group will be contingent on the child’s stopping or bringing under control the behavior that precipitated the separation; and
3. The child will be returned to the group as soon as the behavior that precipitated the separation abates or stops.
Children between the ages of 6 weeks and 16 months will NOT be separated from the group as a means of behavior guidance.
SEPARATION REPORT
All separations from the group will be noted on a daily log that includes the following: The child’s name, the staff person’s name, time, date, information indicating what les-intrusive methods were used to guide the child’s behavior, and how the child’s behavior continued to threaten the well-being of the child or other children in our care.
If a child is separated from the group three or more times in one day, the child’s parent will be notified and the parent notification will be indicated on the daily log. If a child is separated five times or more in one week or eight times or more in two weeks, the procedure outlined in the section titled “Persistent Unacceptable Behavior” will be followed.
If a child is suspended from his/her elementary school due to behavior or discipline issues, we also will not care for the child during the suspension period.
POSITIVE SUPPORTS RULE
The Positive Supports Rule (PSR-Minnesota Rules, chapter 9544) requires all DHS license holders to use person-centered principle and positive support strategies when providing services for individuals, including children, with developmental disabilities or related conditions.
OPEN DOOR POLICY/MN DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
Parents of enrolled children are welcome to visit our program at any time during hours of operation.
The telephone number of the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS), Division of Licensing is 651-431-6500.
In addition, our general philosophy and curriculum regarding managing behavior is as follows:
It is our philosophy at Peace of Mind Early Education Center that we wish to work with every child, every family, through every situation. We believe that as early childhood educators, we have a responsibility to help children develop appropriate behaviors, and to work through difficult periods.
Many behaviors, such as biting, and other aggressive behaviors, can be very upsetting to the child’s parent and the other parents in the group even though they are developmentally normal behaviors experienced by many children for a time and then most will learn more effective coping skills.
We are committed to devote the necessary resources to protect the children in our care, while also working to meet the needs of the child that is experiencing difficult behaviors, as long as we have the support and partnership of all custodial parents. We must work together on strategies that will best serve the child in developing new, more appropriate skills.
We will respect each child’s right to confidentiality, and communicate with the child’s parent regularly regarding the child’s progress.
We expect cooperation from parents in these efforts. If we have parent cooperation, we fully anticipate that we will be able to help every child. Each situation is considered individually. We work as a team involving the parents, administration, teachers and other resources if necessary from the very beginning to develop an Individualized Child Care Plan (ICCP) to meet the needs of each child.
In some circumstances, all parties may determine that group care is not the best situation for a child. If a child requires one-on-one care for an extended period of time, and the behaviors are not improving, or if a child consistently requires more care than we can provide in a group care setting, it may be best to remove the child from group care for a period of time. In that case, we reserve the right to terminate childcare if we feel it is in the best interest of the child.
We also reserve the right to terminate care if we feel that we do not have the full support from parents.
In our Preschool classrooms we use a behavior guidance program from the Core Knowledge Curriculum called “Stop and Think”. We use this in combination with a program called “Responsive Classroom.” These programs share a common belief that the teachers job is to model expectations for children, make it clear what is expected and then provide logical consequences if a child is not following expectations. For example, if a child spills their milk or dumps their glass intentionally, either way, the consequence would be to have them help with cleaning up the spill. This teaches children to make a choice about their behavior, with every choice there is a consequence. More information is available from your child’s classroom teacher or by speaking with the assistant director or director.
I have read, understand and agree with the Peace of Mind Behavior Guidance and Philosophy Statement. All custodial parents, please sign and return to update or complete your child’s enrollment.
Parent Signature:___________________________ Date:_________________________
Parent Signature:___________________________ Date:_________________________

Peace of Mind Behavior Guidance and Philosophy Statement
Our behavior guidance policy is designed to:
 Ensure that each child is provided with a positive model of acceptable behavior.
 Be tailored to the developmental level of the children that the program is licensed to serve.
 Redirect children and groups away from problems toward constructive activity in order to reduce conflict.
 Teach children how to use acceptable alternatives to problem behavior in order to reduce conflict.
 Protect the safety of children and staff persons.
 Provide immediate and directly related consequences for a child’s unacceptable behavior.
Young children need to be taught appropriate behaviors. Appropriate alternatives to corporal punishment vary as children grow and develop.
As infants become more mobile, the staff will create a safe space and impose limitations by encouraging activities that distract them from harmful situations. Brief verbal expressions of disapproval help prepare infants and toddlers for later use of reasoning. For toddlers, disapproval will be followed with comments and expected behaviors.
Preschoolers have begun to develop and understanding of rules and can understand ‘break tie” to calm down (Out-of-group activity by sending the child to a calming activity such as puzzles, sensory table). However, children will never be isolated from the group. The teacher will follow up by asking the child about his/her feelings and suggest appropriate behavior.
School-age children begin to develop a sense of personal responsibility and self-control and will recognize the removal of privileges.
We promote positive behavior in the following ways:
1. The classrooms are designed to be developmentally appropriate.
2. There are sufficient toys and activities to stimulate children of all age groups we serve.
3. The staff model, encourage and praise positive behaviors by using clear and positive statements of behavior expectations.
4. The curriculum is designed to be stimulating and age appropriate for the children.
5. The staff appropriately supervises and interacts with the children.
PERSISTENT UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOR
Peace of Mind Early Education Center will use the following procedure for behavior that is persistent and unacceptable that requires an increased amount of staff guidance and time. This behavior policy applies to all children in our care.

If a child is not behaving appropriately, we will use the following positive guidance techniques:
1. Ignoring: Ignoring a child who is trying to gain attention by acting out may be an appropriate response, unless it is a behavior that is unsafe.
2. Redirection/Distraction: This technique offers an alternative to a child such as suggesting a new activity, or different toy, encouraging independent play, or interacting with the child in a different way.
3. Discussion: Discussion with the child how their behavior is inappropriate and engaging with the child other words or methods that would suggest a more appropriate response.
4. Reasonable Consequences: The staff may implement reasonable consequences such as taking away a toy if the child used the toy to hit another child.
5. Take a Break: The child is separated from the group to calm down and will have access to something else to do. While the child will remain supervised, his or her classmates will not immediately influence him or her. This is different from the concept of “time out,” which is often seen as more punitive as the child is isolated and does nothing. In “take a break” the child will have access to other activities while he or she settles down. Once the negative behavior is under control, the child can be returned to the group. We do not use “take a break” with children under two years of age.
When staff observes a persistent unacceptable behavior they will observe and record the behavior in writing. If these positive guidance techniques are not effective, we may involve parents/guardians with the following progressive guidance techniques:
1. We will inform parent/guardians in writing what behaviors have been observed and what the staff has done to try to modify the behavior.
2. If the inappropriate behavior continues, the Center Director and teacher will meet with parents/guardians to develop a written action plan to correct the behavior. We will seek their input and agree on steps to attempt to modify the behavior. We may suggest involving outside resources to assist with the situation.
3. If the inappropriate behavior persists, the child will need to take a day or two of behavior leave of absence on the next scheduled day/s of care. (Standard attendance rates apply during behavioral leaves).
4. After returning to group care, if the child continues to act inappropriately, we may dis-enroll the child. We reserve the right to use these progressive guidance techniques at our discretion. It is our goal to work together for a positive outcome of behavior change. Circumstances may arise when we may immediately dis-enroll a child if his or her behavior creates a health or safety risk to themselves, other children, or the staff.
PROHIBITED ACTIONS
Positive reinforcement is the best approach to discipline. The following actions are prohibited by or at the direction of a staff person:
1. Subjection of a child to corporal punishment, which includes but is not limited to: Rough handling, shoving, hair pulling, ear pulling, shaking, slapping, kicking, biting, pinching, hitting, and spanking.
2. Subjection of a child to emotional stress, which includes but is not limited to: Name calling, ostracism, shaming, making derogatory remarks about a child or the child’s family, and using language that threatens, humiliates or frightens a child.
3. Separation of a child from the group except within rule requirements.
Punishments for lapses in toileting.
Withholding food, light, warmth, clothing, or medical care as a punishment for unacceptable behavior.
The use of physical restraint other than to physically hold a child where containment is necessary to protect a child or others from harm.
The use of mechanical restraints, such as tying.
SEPARATION FROM THE GROUP
No child may be separated from the group unless the following has occurred;
1. Less intrusive methods of guiding the child’s behavior have been tried and were ineffective.
2. The child’s behavior threatens the well-being of the child or other children in the program.
A child who requires separation from the group will:
1. Remain within an unenclosed part of the classroom where the child can be continuously seen and heard by a program staff person;
2. The child’s return to the group will be contingent on the child’s stopping or bringing under control the behavior that precipitated the separation; and
3. The child will be returned to the group as soon as the behavior that precipitated the separation abates or stops.
Children between the ages of 6 weeks and 16 months will NOT be separated from the group as a means of behavior guidance.
SEPARATION REPORT
All separations from the group will be noted on a daily log that includes the following: The child’s name, the staff person’s name, time, date, information indicating what les-intrusive methods were used to guide the child’s behavior, and how the child’s behavior continued to threaten the well-being of the child or other children in our care.
If a child is separated from the group three or more times in one day, the child’s parent will be notified and the parent notification will be indicated on the daily log. If a child is separated five times or more in one week or eight times or more in two weeks, the procedure outlined in the section titled “Persistent Unacceptable Behavior” will be followed.
If a child is suspended from his/her elementary school due to behavior or discipline issues, we also will not care for the child during the suspension period.
POSITIVE SUPPORTS RULE
The Positive Supports Rule (PSR-Minnesota Rules, chapter 9544) requires all DHS license holders to use person-centered principle and positive support strategies when providing services for individuals, including children, with developmental disabilities or related conditions.
OPEN DOOR POLICY/MN DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
Parents of enrolled children are welcome to visit our program at any time during hours of operation.
The telephone number of the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS), Division of Licensing is 651-431-6500.
In addition, our general philosophy and curriculum regarding managing behavior is as follows:
It is our philosophy at Peace of Mind Early Education Center that we wish to work with every child, every family, through every situation. We believe that as early childhood educators, we have a responsibility to help children develop appropriate behaviors, and to work through difficult periods.
Many behaviors, such as biting, and other aggressive behaviors, can be very upsetting to the child’s parent and the other parents in the group even though they are developmentally normal behaviors experienced by many children for a time and then most will learn more effective coping skills.
We are committed to devote the necessary resources to protect the children in our care, while also working to meet the needs of the child that is experiencing difficult behaviors, as long as we have the support and partnership of all custodial parents. We must work together on strategies that will best serve the child in developing new, more appropriate skills.
We will respect each child’s right to confidentiality, and communicate with the child’s parent regularly regarding the child’s progress.
We expect cooperation from parents in these efforts. If we have parent cooperation, we fully anticipate that we will be able to help every child. Each situation is considered individually. We work as a team involving the parents, administration, teachers and other resources if necessary from the very beginning to develop an Individualized Child Care Plan (ICCP) to meet the needs of each child.
In some circumstances, all parties may determine that group care is not the best situation for a child. If a child requires one-on-one care for an extended period of time, and the behaviors are not improving, or if a child consistently requires more care than we can provide in a group care setting, it may be best to remove the child from group care for a period of time. In that case, we reserve the right to terminate childcare if we feel it is in the best interest of the child.
We also reserve the right to terminate care if we feel that we do not have the full support from parents.
In our Preschool classrooms we use a behavior guidance program from the Core Knowledge Curriculum called “Stop and Think”. We use this in combination with a program called “Responsive Classroom.” These programs share a common belief that the teachers job is to model expectations for children, make it clear what is expected and then provide logical consequences if a child is not following expectations. For example, if a child spills their milk or dumps their glass intentionally, either way, the consequence would be to have them help with cleaning up the spill. This teaches children to make a choice about their behavior, with every choice there is a consequence. More information is available from your child’s classroom teacher or by speaking with the assistant director or director.
I have read, understand and agree with the Peace of Mind Behavior Guidance and Philosophy Statement. All custodial parents, please sign and return to update or complete your child’s enrollment.
Parent Signature:___________________________ Date:_________________________
Parent Signature:___________________________ Date:_________________________